Posts tagged “esc notes

2020 Country Profiles & ESC Notes

Eurovision Obsession logoHello Dear Readers!

Even though our beloved Eurovision has been cancelled for this year, that doesn’t mean that things have gone silent. In fact, quite the opposite has occurred as fan media outlets (including this one) have rushed to fill the void. And while next week I’ll have coverage of the major fan polls in an attempt to reach consensus on who would have won had ESC 2020 been held, that does not mean you should go into Eurovision Week 2020 unarmed! I am releasing my Notes (10 pages of covering ESC history, rules, recap of the 2020 entries, highlights of 2020, and general info) and Country Profiles for all the alternative ESC programming going on this week. The annual lyrics quiz will be coming in June. Per usual, feel free to distribute at your (virtual and/or socially-distanced) Eurovision 2020 gatherings, however those may look. See you next week as we try to make sense of this most unusual ESC season.

ESC 2020 – Write-ups

2020 Country Profiles


ESC Write-Ups & Quizzes

Hello Dear Readers!

As you know, one of the primary objectives of Eurovision Obsession is to help introduce new people to the ESC. To that effect,each year since 2013, I have been posting the notes that I originally crafted for my Eurovision parties introducing my American friends to the Contest. These notes include a brief history of the Contest, a brief explanation of its rules, highlights for that particular year, an explainer of Eurovision Week, and profiles of each competing country. Additionally, for the more obsessed, EO has been making quizzes on the website Sporcle since 2015 for those who want to test their knowledge.

Below, you will find the complete collection of Eurovision Write-Ups and Country Profiles published on this website as well as links to each Sporcle quiz EO has produced.

Eurovision 2020 – Rotterdam

Eurovision 2019 – Tel Aviv

*Some of the country profiles have outdated info in the brief histories, EO apologizes for the error.

Eurovision 2018 – Lisbon

Eurovision 2017 – Kyiv

Eurovision 2016 – Stockholm

Eurovision 2015 – Vienna

Eurovision 2014 – Copenhagen

Eurovision 2013 – Malmö


Eurovision 2019 – Grand Final Predictions

Hello Dear Readers!

Finally, it is here: The Grand Final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019 in Tel Aviv! One of the greatest days of the year. So, what are we looking at? Well, an array of uptempo crowd-stoppers, a once-in-an-era ballad that has been a runaway odds-favorite since it was selected, and a piece of crossover-operatic-musical-whimsy.

For your ESC Parties:

  • Help your uninitiated friends with my Eurovision for Beginners

  • Check-out my ESC 2019 – Write-ups that provide a brief history of ESC, explains the rules, and gives an explanation of the songs.

  • Also check-out my 2019 Country Profiles – Grand Final Only which covers the 26 entries of the Grand Final – giving a brief history of each country, details of each entry, and a brief bio for each performing artist.

 

After two semi-finals (live notes for the first and second semis) short on surprises (hmm, Portugal failing and Belarus qualifying might be the two biggest ones), We turn to a Grand Final with a running order that may turn things over completely. Let’s look at the top ten in the betting odds (post-jury final):

  1. The Netherlands (performing 12th)

  2. Australia (performing 25th)

  3. Switzerland (performing 24th)

  4. Sweden (performing 9th)

  5. Italy (performing 22nd)

  6. Iceland (performing 17th)

  7. Russia (performing 5th)

  8. Azerbaijan (performing 20th)

  9. France (performing 21st)

  10. Norway (performing 15th)

First reactions: Cyprus, Greece, and Malta are completely out of the top ten (guess they truly were pretenders). Australia and France have moved into the top ten, while France peaked around third place and started dropping again, Australia has firmly placed itself into the second position behind the Netherlands after qualifying on Tuesday night.

If the Netherlands was in the second half, I would say it was an easy win for the Dutch. While 12th is a good spot, it is surely not the sure thing that, say, 22nd is. So, now the door is open for the likes of Switzerland (which has the strongest staging and performance across the 41 entries), Italy (whose edge and novelty helps it standout), and Australia (a powerful and captivating song that has shot up the odds á la Cyprus 2018).

 

In my opinion, the winner will be one of these four

The Netherlands     Australia      Italy     Switzerland

Dutch Flag Map

 

 

The Netherlands, my personal favorite, is perhaps one of the highest quality entries to date. It is earnest, honest, and heart-breaking. It also suffers from a singer without much stage presence leading to a boring, trite staging.

 

 

Australian flag map

 

Australia is perhaps the most fun “believe in yourself” song we’ve seen since, perhaps, Austria 2014. It has the magic of a Disney song and a whimsical staging that is absolutely stunning. It also is a song from a country that historically fares quite terribly with the televoters surrounded by two equally as mesmerizing stagings and songs (Switzerland and Spain).

 

 

 

Italian flag map

Italy is a powerful, dark song that stirs deep emotions in the listener performed passionately from a country that is quite popular with juries and televoters. However, it is staged in such a way to diminish this impact – much brighter than it should be; not to mention, juxtaposed to France (which is preceding it), it may come off as over dark.

 

 

 

 

Swiss flag map

Switzerland, much forlorn and forgotten on the Eurovision stage, has come with the tightest, most interesting, most dynamic performance this year and beyond. Unfortunately, this is a rather generic song that is like so much else we hear on the radio; plus, the juries historically drag down the Swiss.

 

 

Taking all of this into consideration, right now, if I had to predict the winner (and I do, since I am a decade-long ESC blogger), I believe that The Netherlands will win!

EO logo witch Dutch flag

I have believed this from the first time I heard the song and am choosing to stick to my instincts on this. Its quality as a composition, as a lyrical work, and in Duncan Laurence’s sheer vocal talent will all shine through. I think the Netherlands will handedly win the jury vote and, furthermore, will finish top five among the televote, though, not number one, but still high enough to win the Contest.

I think the top ten will comprise of:

  1. The Netherlands

  2. Switzerland

  3. Australia

  4. Italy

    Icelandic flag map

  5. Sweden

  6. Iceland

    Maltese flag map

  7. Malta

  8. Russia

  9. Norway

  10. Serbia

And who will be in the Bottom Ten? I hate thinking of the negative, but again, I must make a prediction:

Cypriot flag map

  1. North Macedonia

  2. Cyprus

  3. Denmark

  4. Belarus

  5. Israel

  6. Albania

  7. Estonia

  8. San Marino

  9. United Kingdom

  10. Germany

As y’all know, I love North Macedonia, Albania, and Denmark – but I cannot see them succeeding (this is doubly so as Albania was put in the 2nd slot, which is generally reserved for the weakest ballad).

Quite frankly, while my prediction average needs to go back up (it’s back down below 80%, currently) as long as the Netherlands wins, I will be happy. I cannot wait to see how this turns out!

Happy Eurovision Everyone!
Be sure to come back tonight so you can follow my live notes as the Contest unfolds.


Eurovision Notes 2019!

Hello Dear Readers and Happy Eurovision Week!

Eurovision Obsession logoOnce again, I have created notes for y’all’s various Eurovision parties. This way you do not have to answer the same questions, over and over again.

First, we have the Notes! This includes a brief history of the Contest, a summary of the major rules, information about this year’s event, and what to expect from the show. Also, new this year, I have included brief summaries of each song.

ESC 2019 Write-ups

Second, we have the traditional country profiles! A brief rundown of a country’s history, this year’s entry, and a little bit about the performing artist. All in alphabetical order (by country).

2019 Country Profiles*

Enjoy!! I’m going to try to update them so you can have Grand Final versions.

*Editor’s Note: This version of the country profiles has some outdated info. EO apologizes for the error.


2017 Eurovision for Beginners & ESC Notes 2017

Hello Dear Readers!

Eurovision continues is reaching a wider audience than ever before! I’d thought it would be a good idea to create a quick reference post for newbies to the Contest. Here are the top ten things you need to know in order to understand and enjoy Eurovision.

1. The Contest began in 1956 in order to bring together war-torn Europe. Starting with just seven countries, the Contest has exploded as Europe welcomed new countries. There are a total of 42 countries involved in ESC 2017, spanning the continent and beyond.

2. The participating countries are randomly split in half based on their voting history and must compete in one of either two semi-finals. Ten songs qualify from each semi-final and meet the automatic qualifiers in the Grand Final.

3. The automatic qualifiers are the host country, which is the defending champion, and the Big Five. These are the countries with the five largest television audiences in Europe and pay the most to the EBU (the organization that runs Eurovision). These countries are: France, Spain, Italy, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

4. The competitors are broadcasting companies (typically government-run) that select a representative to fly the flag. Countries can choose their entries any way they like. Some opt for a competition in which artists compete with songs, some choose an artist and song internally, and some do a combination of these things.

5. Songs can be in any language, but most choose English (or partially English) to broaden their entry’s appeal. Songs cannot have offensive, overtly sexual, political, or overtly religious lyrics. All lyrics can be found, in English and French, on the official website: eurovision.tv.

6. All performers (singers, backing singers, and dancers) must be at least 16 on the day of their first night of competition. No animals are allowed on stage. All music must be provided by backing track, but all singing must be done live. Songs must be no longer than three minutes.

7. Voting results are a 50/50 combination of professional juries and public vote (televoting). Each country provides a jury of five music professionals; they watch the second dress rehearsal (the evening before the televised show) and cast their votes then. Televoting occurs during the televised show during a fifteen minute window after the last song is performed.

8. Every competing country, regardless if they qualified for the Grand Final, vote for the winner. The results of the jury are revealed, country by country. The televoting is then revealed in ascending order, from least points to most points.

9. The winning song has the honor of being reprised at the end of the show. The winning artist gets a crystal trophy shaped liked a microphone. The winning composers and lyricists receive plaques. The winning broadcaster and country get to host the Contest the following year.

10. The Eurovision Song Contest is for EVERYONE. Despite the stereotypes, Eurovision is enjoyed by all kinds of people across the world and has the goal of uniting us ALL through music for one week a year.

Annual Notes

Craving for more information about Eurovision? Check out my ESC Notes that give a look at the history, rules, and notable quirks about the Contest. They were written with a particular eye towards those new to the Contest.

 Notes for ESC 2017

Want more information specific to ESC 2017? My country profiles will satiate your appetite as they cover information for each competing nation – their history and the background of their competing artists.

 ESC 2017 Country Profiles – Grand Finalists Only
ESC 2017 Country Profiles – All Participants

Wondering how you can hear great hits from Eurovision’s past? I have assembled playlists capturing different elements of Eurovision. This includes an Eurovision for Beginners playlist with twenty of the most influencial and historically important entries of all time.

Last year during the Second Semi-Final, two great productions were made wherein hosts Petra Mede and Måns Zelmerlöw explain the Contest in fun ways.

Support Eurovision Obsession on Patreon.
Follow @escobsession on Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube, and Sporcle


Notes for Eurovision 2015!

Hello Dear Readers!

As I do each year, I have provided some notes to help you put this year’s Contest into historical perspective. Feel free to print them and have them on hand for your Eurovision party or just read them and be the most knowledgeable person in the room!

Eurovision 2015 Write-ups


ESC2014 – Final Predictions and Notes

Hello Dear Readers!

Finally, after much struggle and anguish and many hours, I have finally resolved enough of my technical woes to finally be able to post my notes for y’all!

Eurovision 2014 Write-ups

2014 Country Profiles

 

Reactions from the Jury Final

Last night was the jury final and I can safely say that only one country had a bad enough performance to hurt themselves.  Though, Italy had, by far, the worse performance.  It was pretty flat.  This will definitely be Italy’s worse finish since returning.  Even if Emma has a mind-blowing performance tonight, I see little reason to believe that she will score any higher than 15 based on the jury performance alone.

The UK also had some minor issues when a backing singer tried to end the song a few seconds early.  I am sure that will not happen again tonight. Poland also seemed to suffer from some timing issues that affected the performance.

A few countries also helped their case.  Azerbaijan, a song that was already jury fodder, will likely score very highly for the performance she gave last night.  Likewise, Austria, Sweden, and Switzerland also gave exhilerating performances that are sure to go over well with the juries.  I won’t go into more detail because they were minor improvements to their semi-final performances.  Spain gave a good performance as well.  Valentina Monetta from San Marino was the most improved from her semi-final performance and has secured that she will at least be spared the embarassment of a null points.

Final Predictions

Well, I think (and really, really hope) that this will be the closest Contest in quite some time.  The odds favorite is now Austria, with Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, and the UK right behind.  After that, the odds begin to drop.  After much back and forth and consultation with my new friends waiting in line for the shows, I truly think that Sweden will take the crown.  Denmark’s song and staging is weak.  The Netherlands will benefit from being so close to the end and so different from everything else, but at the end of the day, country has never placed higher than second at ESC and I do not think that will change this year.  I do not think the juries will be as enamored with the UK entry as the fans are.  Even though the Austrian entry is my favorite this year, I do not think it will be a winner.  Aside from Conchita Wurst’s look, songs in this style – big, dramatic, ballads that sound like they should be on a James Bond soundtrack – do not have as much mass appeal as one would think.  Especially, not compared to more traditional pop ballads such as the one Sweden has.  Sweden has a simple staging that emphasizing the song; its subtly and power seperate it from the other entries, the juries traditionally like these kinds of songs, and the drama is just enough to captivate audiences without scaring them off.  Undo has the perfect combination of factors to carry the trophy, and the Contest, back across the Øresund for the sixtieth edition in 2015

After Sweden, I think the remaining Top Ten will be:

  • Austria
  • UK
  • The Netherlands
  • Azerbaijan
  • Spain
  • Montenegro
  • Greece
  • Ukraine
  • Hungary

As far as the Bottom Five, I would predict Italy, Belarus, Iceland, Slovenia, and Finland.  These five lack a combination of adequate public appeal, public interest, and stagning.

Final Thoughts Ahead of the Grand Final

Let’s try to keep the politics out of ESC!  This goes both ways.  As far as Russia is concerned, booing Russia does not help anything and only encourages the true villains more.  What happens when you boo the Tomaschevy Twins is that you are booing 17 girls who are Junior Eurovision champions – that’s all.  The best way to handle the situation is to sit quietly; lack of reaction is much more impactful.  Additionally, with Austria.  What the character of Conchita Wurst represents is great, but that is no reason to vote.  Give Austria points because Rise Like a Pheonix is an amazing song, not because you want the drag queen to win.

And with that, enjoy the show!!  It promises to be fantastic!  I will be keeping live notes the best I can from the ESC party that I am attending.  See you this evening!


Eurovision 2013 – Updated Notes!

Howdy All!

As you prepare for the Grand Final, I have prepped documents giving a brief overview of the Contest’s history, rules, the voting system, and each participating country.  I have previously posted these, but thought it would be good idea to re-post them.  I have also updated the country profiles to include the Grand Final running order.  Keep them for yourself, share with friends, print them out and have them ready for the passing during your Eurovision Party — whatever works for you!

Eurovision 2013 Notes

ESC 2013 Country Profiles

Eurovision History Brief

Eurovision Voting Brief

Eurovision Rules Brief

Eurovision Week


ESC2013 – Final Preparations

esc2013 logo

As we head into the last few days ahead of the Eurovision Song Contest 2013 – Malmö, I thought it would be good idea to provide some resources to help your ESC preparations.  I have been hosting Eurovision Parties for the last two years with the small group of friends that I have converted to ESC fandom.  I have always written up brief profiles of the competing countries as well as several briefs detailing the ESC history, rules, and procedures – as well as notes about the current year’s edition.  I have decided to make these available for you to use at your own Eurovision parties (and/or personal edification). I’ll update with the running order numbers after they’re released next Friday morning.  On Sunday, I’ll have my final predictions for this year’s Contest!

ESC2013Eurovision History Brief

Eurovision Rules Brief

Eurovision Voting Brief

Eurovision Week

Eurovision 2013 Notes

ESC 2013 Country Profiles