Posts tagged “dana international

Surprises of ESC2013 thus far

Hello Dear Readers!  Today was a big day – we finally have a running order for the semi-finals!  I will be making a post about that in the coming weeks.  You can find the running orders here: http://www.eurovision.tv/page/news?id=eurovision_2013_semi-final_running_order_revealed.

 

Instead, while I prepare that blog post, I will give you another one that has been mulling over in my mind.  The eight biggest surprises I’ve discovered thus far as I have been diving into ESC coverage.  This list is unranked.

 

  • Denmark is the big leader STILL.  Check the polling sites, the betting sites, the commentary sites – Denmark is the favorite to win come May!  This is not only surprising but rather pleasing!  As soon as I heard the song I thought it was a winner, then it took DMGP, and now it’s the big favorite to win.  How exciting!  Is it too early to say next year in Copenhagen (or perhaps Århus)?
  • Azerbaijan is nowhere to be seen. This goes beyond simply the fact that the Caucasus country is not on anyone’s radar in terms of succeeding.  Normally, AZ is throwing money at the Contest; normally, we would have seen at least one official music video, a remix, and several tour dates for the Azerbaijani entry to promote their song. Perhaps they don’t want to run the risk of winning again so soon.
  • The Netherlands is not only popular, but has a legitimate shot at winning. I love Birds, despite the fact that the lyrics require a lot of thinking about to help them make sense, it’s an amazing song and goes in a completely different direction than any other entry has for quite a while.  Apparently, Europe loves this, too.  And Anouk’s voice only sweetens the pot!
  • Albania is popular?! I don’t understand it, but apparently there’s a large group of people out there who think this song is amazing.  It’s okay, but I completely don’t understand the hype around this entry.
  • San Marino may actually qualify this year. Despite being slotted the #2 spot in the Second Semi-Final (in case you did not know, no country has ever won the Contest being performed in the #2 spot, but people have qualified out of the semi-final from it) which means it will be harder to maintain its impression in viewers’ minds, it is rather popular and has a chance to qualify.  It would be San Marino’s first ever trip to the Grand Final.
  • Lithuania and Montenegro have a strong fan following, France does not. Searching around the internet, I have come across a lot of fan rankings and Lithuania and Montenegro actually seem to be fairly well liked around the world wide web.  France, on the other hand, is not.  Despite the constant whining of fans that there are too many “ballads” (which, there not, it’s really no more than any other year) this fast and unique song is not appreciated.
  • Macedonia is getting a lot of backlash, still. Really, people?  I understand that Imperija was an amazing entry, it was off-tempo, powerful, and beautifully blended the pop and traditional musical styles of Macedonia.  However, Pred da se Razdeni fits these characteristics as well.  So, what’s the issue?

The number of non-English language songs is increasing. I think it speaks volumes that Moldova switched to Romanian.  More countries are using the ESC stage to display a part of their culture – their language.  I think this is a change for the better.  However, there has only been a few non-English entries that have had a serious shot at winning since 1998. Molitva.(SER2007) is the only non-English winner since the language rule was abandoned in 1999, and only the third since in the past twenty Contests (NOR1995, ISR1998, SER2007).  This year, Moldova is the most popular non-English entry, but still does not have much chance to win.

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ESC 2011 – [Three] Weeks Later

Howdy everyone!  Sorry that this post is a little later than usual – this entry took much longer to write than it was supposed to.  Without further ado, here are my ESC Awards and Final Thoughts for this year’s Contest.

Best Dressed Award:

Winner: Iceland
The guys looked oh so classy in their vests and ties.

First Runner-Up: Slovakia
What the TWiiNS lacked in vocal power they more than made up for in style. I loved the gold and silver dresses that they had on.

Second Runner-Up: The Netherlands
More classy apparel – there’s something about suits that just make people look nice.

Honorable Mention: Norway, France, Italy, Azerbaijan

“Most in Need of a Costume Change” Award:

Winner: Ireland
If this was any act other than Jedward, those hideous red jackets would have derailed that song’s chances of even getting out of the semi-finals.

First Runner-Up: Croatia (Dress #1)
What a hideous garmet!  Her costume change didn’t come fast enough!  I liked the pink dress, though.

Second Runner-Up: Israel
Dana International made this list not just because she wore a very questionable dress, but because she’s known for being on the cutting edge of fashion and this thing that she wore was just…ish.

Honorable Mention: Slovenia, Albania, Romania

I’m scrapping the “Cutest Boy” and “Cutest Gal” categories because they’re somewhat pointless.  Instead, I will be replacing them with the “Best Lyrics” and “Huh?” Awards.

Best Lyrics:

Winner: Albania
“Let me share my song with you, just feel the passion/Love’s the message shining through, a chain reaction…Zot, qe këngën ma ke fal, më lerë të ndarë [God, you who has given me the song, let me share it]/Nuk ka ngjyrë e nuk ka fjalë, muret s’e mbajnë [It has no colour and no words, walls can’t hold it]”
Any song that sings about the glory of God and how much the singer wants to spread the message is a-okay in my book!

First Runner-Up: Bosnia & Herzegovina
“If you take this life from me today…You’ll just find two, three songs of mine/Hundred worries of mine/Your love, your love in rewind…”
Is he talking to a partner?  To the mirror?  To God?  All three?  Someone else?  Is this at the end of a relationship or on a deathbed?  We don’t know because they are endless possibilities – that’s what makes these lyrics so great.

Second Runner-Up: San Marino
“Oh, this life, something so beautiful but hard at the same time…Tonight, can we pretend there’s no more time?/Let’s lock our doors and leave this endless world outside”
While there aren’t groundbreaking lyrics, they are well-written and go far beyond the typical ESC lyrics.

Honorable Mention: Italy, France, The Netherlands, Serbia

“Huh?” Award: Given to the entry with the most questionable, lazy, or just plain nonsensical lyrics

Winner: Armenia
“Boom, boom! Chuka, chuka! Your kiss is like a-, like a-.”
Not only is this lazy writing, but it’s just silly.  “Chuka” is not a word.  “Your kiss is like a, like a,” “like a” what?  You can’t just end a sentence there without any hint to what you’re referring to.  Being a feel good pop song is no excuse for pitiful songwriting.  Somebody should be ashamed of him/herself.

First Runner-Up: Israel
“Ding dong, say no more./I hear silent prayers and they take me high…and fly/I know where to go and I’m coming now!”
Normally, I love Dana International’s songs, but Ding Dong is simply weak. From the verses I get an idea of what the song is about, but this refrain (lyrics above) makes absolutely no sense!

Second Runner-Up: Norway
There are only about eight unique lines of text in this song!
This song is quite lazy lyrically, but at least it’s fun to dance to.

Honorable Mention: Ukraine, Sweden

“Spirit of ABBA” Award: Given to the most stereotypical ESC entry

Winner: Spain
Feel good beats and a pleasant message; a surprisingly original song that continued the Spanish’s tradition of sending authentic entries to the Contest – Spain takes home the ever-so-prestigious Spirit of ABBA Award for 2011.

First Runner-Up: Estonia
Complete with pop-tastic beats, vapid lyrics with some questionable aspects (“One, Two, Seven, Three”), and a fun stage performance.

Second Runner-Up: Belarus
One reason I love the ESC is because of the intense nationalism; however, this song fails because it’s about loving Belarus but is completely in English.

Honorable Mention: Armenia, Norway

“This is D.C. Calling” Award: Given to the most American sounding entry

Winner: Azerbaijan
I think Azerbaijan has either won or placed for this award each of the last three years.  Yet again, the Azerbaijanis send a generic pop song to the Contest and it serves them well.  In fact, it makes me a little proud that it won, and then I remember that there were a slew of entries that were more deserving.

First Runner-Up: Sweden
Aside from the fact that Eric Saade is a pop star due to his looks (and most definitely not for his voice), this song’s questionable lyrics and egocentrism (how many love songs do you know that includes the word “I” more times than it does “you”) would make it feel right at home in the American pop scene.

Second Runner-Up: Switzerland
This pleasant song sounds like something that would grace the indie scene – possibly an indie artist’s one hit song.

Honorable Mention: Russia, Serbia

“Pond Leaper” Award: While I think every song would be able to find a niche here in the USA, these are the songs I think would be the most popular.

Winner: Hungary
Kati Wolf actually sounds like everyone’s favorite diva-to-hate: Celine Dion, except she’s singing a disco-esque song.  This would be eaten up over here!

First Runner-Up: Iceland
An incredibly sincere and heart-warming ballad with a sob story to go along with it that make the lyrics that much more poignant.

Second Runner-Up: Slovenia
A powerful R&B-pop song about a woman scorned that could just have easily been sung by Christina Aguilera, yeah, this song would do quite well on the Billboard charts.

Honorable Mention: Italy, Switzerland, Azerbaijan, Bosnia & Herzegovina

The “Shiri Maimon Travesty of the Year” Award: In 2005, a true work of art was entered into the ESC; Israel was being represented by Shiri Maimon with the song Hasheket Shinish’Ar.  Not only did this song not win, but the winning song that year was not even worthy to be performed on the same stage as the Israeli entry.  For me, that was the biggest travesty in Eurovision history.  Each year, I hand out this award to the biggest disappointment of the Contest.

Winner: The Netherlands getting last place
First off, this was a really hard award to hand out this year, as I am not gravely offended by any of the results this year (not even Sweden’s third place or Ireland’s eighth).  However, the Dutch presented a well-written song with a strong arrangement; I understand that no one in Europe likes the Dutch, but the juries could have at least given the 3JS more points.  This was an undeserved last place for the Netherlands (unlike some of their others).

First Runner-Up: San Marino failing to qualify
I know the Sammarinese have set the goal, at least for now, of using Eurovision as a way of proclaiming their existence, but they had a decent shot of progressing through to the Final this year (and would have if the jury votes had stood alone).  I hope the tiny country keeps trying to qualify.  How awesome would it be to have a Contest in San Marino!

Now, the big award…My Top Ten Award: Given to my ten favorite songs from the Contest.  Like last year, I liked every song enough to put it on my iPod, but only ten of them can make this list.  The winners are ranked from tenth to first (most favorite).  These songs were the ones good enough to grab my attention and affection from the first moment I heard it at the Contest and have gotten the most plays on my iPod.

10. Iceland – powerful lyrics, light melody, great performance

9. Serbia – the lyrics are well-written and authentic, the music is fun, and the performance was strong and energetic

8. Belgium – despite the cheesy lyrics, the arrangement of this song was phenomenal

7. Slovenia – the lyrics are original and tell a story, the music captures the mood as the song progresses, and the Kuec is a powerful singer.

6. Norway – it’s fun, it’s easy to sing along to, it brings a new language to the ESC stage.

5. Germany – Lena 2.0: sexier and more mature than the previous model, this eerie song is as unique as it is captivating

4. Switzerland – how can you not like this song? It sounds like something that a person might sing to their partner before proposing.

3. Albania – it’s a powerful song about the awesomeness of God.

2. Bosnia & Herzegovina – great lyrics, great music, great performance – even more so, it’ll help me introduce the Contest to more of my American friends.

1. Italy – this song is well written, well composed, awesomely performed; very few songs give chills when the first time I hear it performed, but this one did. Bravo Italy!

Final Thoughts:
The biggest story that seems to be coming out of this year’s Contest isn’t the fact that Azerbaijan won but this issue with the juries that seems to continually pop up – Italy won the jury voting, Russia was utterly destroyed by the juries, and the UK didn’t fare too much better.  Let’s not forget that the juries judge songs based upon their hit potential AND their artistic merit.  People complain that Italy’s song has no hit potential, well, they’re overlooking the fact that his album hit number one in Italy, France, and Germany – three of the largest music industries in Europe and the album charted elsewhere.  It really irritates me that people are still whining about them after all this time (case in point, an Oikotimes blog article: http://www.oikotimes.com/eurovision/2011/06/03/jury-system-must-be-abandonded/).  I am ignoring the article, as it’s misinformed and frustrates me (the juries were brought back for the 2008 Contest after complaints – dating back four years – that the semi-final system introduced in 2004 was effectively shutting out Western countries from the Final, Russia’s victory in 2008 merely prompted the EBU to move the juries into the Final.  Macedonia’s two consecutive shut outs at the hands of the jury prompted the body to move 50/50 system into the semi-finals in 2010).  Additionally, yes, the constant rehearsals and PR demands can wear out a performer, but that’s a part of the Contest.  There are four performances that matter for songs that qualify into the Final, if singers and dancers can’t perform four times at 100% then they really don’t deserve to win.  Eric Saade and co. of Sweden was able to give four strong performances and they probably had the most demanding performance of any of the forty-three entrants.  I agree with a few of those who left comments, the juries should have to vote on the night of the Final, simply so that they are judging the same thing as the viewing audience – though, I don’t mind the idea of making performers be consistent.  Additionally, someone complained about bloggers, journalists, lawyers, and producers being allowed to be on juries.  Let’s not forget, while the musicians are the ones who make the music, it’s the media and executives that determine what songs become hits and which ones do not.  Trust me, if the juries were purely artists and researchers, then there would be many more disagreements between the juries and televotes than Italy and Lithuania. I also want to remind one of the comment leavers that in 2008 they having the juries in the semi-finals only, and it resulted in even more anger and controversy when Russia won. If anything, the variance between the two groups that we saw this year only demonstrates how important it is that this 50/50 system stays in place; it seems to be doing its job.  How else would weak songs from popular countries such as Turkey, Armenia, and Norway be kept out so that higher quality entries could go through to the Final?

Speaking of which, one of the Eurovision Radio contributors raised an interesting point on the June 1st show – did Azerbaijan win because Turkey was not in the Final?  It makes sense that AZR was able to pick up votes that otherwise would have went to Turkey, particularly from the televoters.  Conversely, the two songs were so different, maybe it would not have made a difference if Turkey had qualified or not – at least not when it came to the jury side of things.  It will be very interesting to see the legacy that Running Scared leaves behind.  I think it definitely continues the trend of more serious entries winning over more frivolous ones.  However, it is the definition of generic pop song, hopefully, next year won’t be full of robotic acts that try to repeat AZR’s success.  I do hope that inspires more broadcasters to ship their acts around the continent to promote their entries, particularly for Eastern songs to go out West and vice versa.

I think this year a very distinct line was drawn in the sand between the performance entries (Ireland, Sweden, Russia, Estonia, etc) and the entries of artistic merit (Italy, France, Switzerland, Austria, etc), and I think this is why the jury issues seem to be louder than anything else, especially with this being the first time that the juries and televoters disagree.  It will be very interesting to see if this divide continues to grow next year, or will the entries start to converge back towards the middle; let’s hope for the latter!

I will leave you with a note about the entry I think that was the most overlooked and downright ignored.  Spain’s Que Me Quiten lo Bailao – They Can’t Take Away the Fun from Me performed by Lucía Pérez was a fun entry that was among the favorites of all in attendance at my Eurovision party.  Its lyrics offered a refreshingly different message than any other song for quite a few years, the music was bouncy and lighthearted, and the performance was just perfect for the song.  I hope the result doesn’t discourage Ms. Pérez; though, she’s a seasoned professional, so I doubt that it will.  Either way, Muy Bien España!

With that, I close out my blogs on the Eurovision Song Contest 2011 – Düsseldorf.  In the upcoming year, I will be posting entries about Svante Stockselius, his legacy and the challenges he left to be faced by Jon Ola Sand, news and thoughts about the upcoming Contest in Baku, the Junior Eurovision Song Contest (held in Yerevan, Armenia this year), and news and thoughts about entries as they become available.


ESC2011: Semi-Final Two

Here’s Part Two of my preview for this year’s Contest.  Once again, it looks as if the Second Semi-Final will be the stronger of the two heats, how does this always seem to happen?  From a returning champion (Israel) to one of ESC’s most beloved novelty acts (Moldova) to a singer who garnered international attention after reading results last year (Sweden).  Oh, it’s going to be an awesome show, of that I am sure.  While the Ukraine, Sweden, Moldova, Israel, Denmark, and Ireland all seem like sure things this year, I think this Semi-Final will bring us a few surprises.  Also in this post, I will discuss the three automatic qualifiers who will be voting in Semi-Final 2, France, Germany, and…ITALY!!!

Bosnia and Herzegovina – Love in Rewind performed by Dino Merlin

Typically, former Top Ten placers tend to be a shoo-in for a spot in the Final, even if their previous song was terrible (which Mr. Merlin’s was).  Funniest online comment: “This guy is like a mix of Cat Stevens and Ringo Starr.  The coolest grandpa ever.”  And the bookies predict this finishing in the top ten.  I’m not convinced from the lyrics and internet buzz that this entry has what it takes to make the Top Ten, but I definitely think that it will pass through to the Final.

Austria – The Secret is Love performed by Nadine Beiler

When it comes to Austria, the entries I like do poorly and the entries I hate do well, judging by the competition Beiler beat out to make it to Düsseldorf, I am assuming she is going to do well.  Okay, that’s not fair, as there were several songs I did really like from this year’s Austrian selection.  Most of the buzz focuses around her powerful voice, not so much around the song, and we all know that this is a SONG contest not a talent search – better luck next year Austria.

Netherlands – Never Alone performed by 3JS

Not all things are better with age.  Having done a little research on the 3JS when they were first selected to represent the Netherlands, I liked a lot of their stuff, now, hearing the four songs that failed to win Nationaal Songfestival 2011, I don’t have much faith in the Dutch this year and neither do the bookies.  But the fans (all 20 of them) seem to love it – which, given their small numbers doesn’t mean much, but an interesting point came up, this song should be fodder for the juries and this prediction might just ring true.

Belgium – With Love Baby performed by Witloof Bay

An a capella group, how exciting!  In the US, a capella is predominated nowadays by university students, so it’s a very different experience for me to see a group of middle aged folks performing a capella, but they’re really good.  I hope and pray that they make it to the Final (apparently, LAT2006 is the only other entry to ever be done a capella, it got 16th).  The bookies think that this entry will do horribly, but it’s Belgium – the only country to succeed with a song in an imaginary language (though, they also failed with a similar concept six years later).  So, if any country can pull this off, it’s Belgium.

Slovakia – I’m Still Alive performed by TWiiNS

So, the TWiiNS bring us Slovakia’s first-ever English language entry and it’s reception is….piss-poor.  People don’t seem to necessarily love it, with the general consensus being, “it’s good enough for the Final.”  With such lackluster support I turn to the bookies who seem to feel similarly.  Songs that fall in this position tend to finish right outside the top ten of their semi-final.  So I would expect Slovakia to get 12th or 13th place in the Semi-Final, narrowly missing its first trip to the Finals.

Ukraine – Angels performed by Mika Newton

Again, the Ukraine has a controversy around its national selection, but at least this time, it was all taken care of prior to the entry submission deadline.  With that said, Ukraine had a stereotypically strong national final this year, I predict that this song will do what all but three Ukraine entries have done before, finish in the Top Ten on Saturday (but it won’t win).

Moldova – So Lucky performed by Zdob şi Zdub

Another returning artist that I wished had stayed home; the Moldovan rockers are back at the ESC, though this time they are minus the grandma.  It’s interesting to see how the tide turns in online comments.  The same people who have been routinely trashing the ballads and the poppier entries seem to love this and vice versa.  With that said, I just can’t see Moldova succeeding with this kind of level of negativity going on.  I expect them to make the Final (partially because people will recognize the band’s name, partly because Romania, Bulgaria, and Ukraine are all in this Semi-Final) but to not do all that well once they get there.

Sweden – Popular performed by Eric Saade

I remember this guy from last year; he had a wretched song that got second place in Melodifestivalen.  I also remember that his stunning good looks while reading the votes for Sweden last year helped that same wretched single land on some top 100 charts around Europe.  This year’s Melodifestivalen reminded viewers why the Swedes had the biggest, most watched, most popular, and most successful national selection year after year, and I think it will continue it’s role as a kingmaker.  Expect Eric Saade to restore some honor to the Swedish throne and land a Top Ten placing for the land of ABBA.  With that said, I have a feeling I will dislike this act and its show.  Saade has openly stated that he wants to cheapen ESC by promoting an increase in stage performers so that there can be “big pop acts” apparently six people isn’t enough for him.  He also dislikes the fact that he can’t use backing vocals.  I think how successful he is come the Grand Final will dictate a lot about where the ESC goes in the future, particularly since there is a new Supervisor at the helm who will be looking for ways to make his mark on the Contest.  I plan on doing a blog entry regarding this topic in the weeks following the Contest, regardless of how the Swedes finish.

Cyprus – San Aggelos S’Agapisa performed by Christos Mylordos

Like many other songs, this entry seems to have a high percentage of positive comments, but a low number of comments overall.  CyBC has done a very poor job of promoting this song and that, and only that, is the reason Cyprus will be left behind in the Semi-Final despite an easy 12 from Greece.

Bulgaria – Na inat performed by Poli Genova

Okay, I can’t even bear to make it through a recap of the Bulgarian selection (don’t worry, I went back and finished it); this does not bode well for its winner. With that said, there seems to be a healthy level of support for this entry so Bulgaria just might sneak into the Final after all, I think it will come down to how she does in the Second Dress Rehearsal, actually, when the juries cast their votes.

Macedonia – Rusinka performed by Vlatko Ilievski

Time for another funny comment from the web: “song is bad…video is funny…boys are cute.”  If you think seeing Azerbaijanis and Armenians (or Serbs and Albanians for that matter) whine amongst themselves on the various ESC forums was annoying, you haven’t seen anything you’ve read the dialogue between Macedonians and Greeks – sickening is what it is!  Anyway, Macedonia never seems to be able to get any love; it has always been an “also ran” at the ESC and I don’t foresee this entry changing that.  Short of some sort of miracle, Macedonia will most likely be sent home in the Semi Finals yet again.

Israel – Ding Dong performed by Dana International

The fabulous diva returns to the Eurovision stage after winning it all for her native Israel back in 1998.  Back then, she made herself an icon and a heroine for many queers across Europe, not only that, but her victory helped lead a revival for the Contest into the new era of exciting stage shows, and televoting.  Winners are all but guaranteed a spot in the Final, so I don’t expect the Semi-Finals to be that big a hindrance for her.  Though, like many returning artists from pre-2004, she needs to be ready to handle how much the Contest has changed over the last decade, including the more elaborate stage performances, the advent of the semi-final (which, for those that make the Final, mean nine rehearsals on top of the two performances), and the return of the jury something Dana International didn’t have to contend with in 1998 or in 2008 when she returned as a song writer (while the juries voted in the semi-finals of 2008, Israel was a clear favorite to progress that year and easily sailed through to the Final).  Though, she has stayed fairly involved over the years, so I imagine these changes won’t affect her too much.  I am inclined to listen to the fans and my own personal preference for Ms. Dana International – I expect this to be in the Top Ten.

Slovenia – No One performed by Maja Keuc

Hmmm, for the first time in a long while, Slovenia seems to have garnered a lot of positive interest from the bookies and from the fans.  Honestly, I must say that I am a little surprised at how well Slovenia is being predicted to do this year.  I expect this song will move through to the Final, but I dare not venture a guess on it’s final placing.

Romania – Change performed by Hotel FM

Romania seems to be getting similar coverage as the Slovenian entry, just less of it.  So I think that this song will also progress on to the Final, but I feel confident in saying that it will not be a Top Ten hit barring some kind of miracle.

Estonia – Rockefeller Street performed by Getter Jaani

Surprisingly, this is a big bookie favorite, something that is new for Estonia (even when it won in 2001, it was quite a surprise)!  The lyrics seem very interesting, and I have seen the magically appearing wand from the National Final.  There seems to be a lot of negative feedback about her voice, but a lot of positive feedback about the song otherwise.  What she lacks in voice quality can more than be made up in a stage show – and they’ve already promised us a good one.  I think this will be Top Ten for sure.

Belarus – I Love Belarus performed by Anastasiya Vinnikova

What is this, the jESC?  That’s the only place for outright patriotic songs; there is no way Europe will stand for this, I don’t care how catchy a tune it is.  Interestingly enough, it’s not biggest longshot to win the Contest according to the bookies.  Also curious, it’s a song about her love for her motherland, but it’s in English, can you say “неконгруэнтность”?  Expect this song to finish near the bottom of the Semi-Final.

Latvia – Angel in Disguise performed by Musiqq

This song seems to not be getting much attention from anyone, fans or bookies.  My impression is that it is a pleasant song, but not memorable, which is a kiss of death for this competition.  Not to mention, R&B/hip-hop tends to not do very well at ESC; so I expect this song to flounder behind in the semi-finals.

Denmark – New Tomorrow performed by A Friend in London

It’s a pretty lousy song, but the bookies seem to like it.  Fan forums are dominated by the plagiarism/not plagiaism controversy.  For an in-depth look at my opinions regarding this entry and the controversy, click here.

Ireland – Lipstick performed by Jedward

Once again the Emerald Isle disappoint with another gag act.  Despite the trend towards more serious ballads and elaborate pop entries over the past few years, Jedward comes this year to strick another blow for comedic acts.  Due to the twins prior success on X-Factor (leading to massive name recognition), this song will probably go through to the Finals.  Hopefully, it will fail, but I think it stand a decent shot at Top Ten.

With that, I now conclude my coverage of the Second Semi-Final.  For those who like summaries, I predict the following ten entries will move forward to the Grand Final: Bosnia & Herzegovina, Ukraine, Moldova, Sweden, Israel, Slovenia, Romania, Estonia, Denmark, Ireland.  Sorry, no real surprises here, there is just too much evidence to go against the popular opinion.  Now, looking ahead to the automatic qualifiers who will be voting on Thursday.

Italy – Madness of Love performed by Raphael Gualazzi

WELCOME BACK ITALY!!!  Yay, it’s always good when a previous winner (not to mention a founding ESC member) returns to the Contest, it’s even better when that former winner is a Contest titan!  Fans have been begging Italy to return since the day it left and will jump at the chance to vote for Italia come Saturday.  The bookies, too, are showering Italy with much love with the general consensus pointing to a Top Ten placing.  With that said, there seems to be a small, but LOUD contigent that really hates this song – but that is the same contigent who seem hate anything that not a fast club thumper, so I am not quite sure how much we should worry about them.  I think Italy will be in the Top Ten.  Many fans of the song fear that they will be in the bottom ten.  I hope regardless of its finish, Italy doesn’t withdraw from the Contest again.

Germany – Taken by a Stranger performed by Lena

So, Dana International is not the only winner trying to pull a Johnny Logan this year, Lena is back and becomes only the third artist (behind Lys Assia and Corrie Brokken) to attempt to defend her crown in the year immediately following her victory.  If she wins again, does that mean she will continue competing for Germany?  It’s amazing to see how much Lena has grown and matured over the past year.  She still has that funky accent, but who cares?  It’s become a part of her performance at this point.  Interestingly enough, the runner-up song, Push Forward appears to be much more popular among the fans, but domestic and international, than Taken by a Stranger.  I think Germany will have a respectable finish (somwhere in the top fifteen songs), but it will not win again.

France – Sognuperformed by Amaury Vassili

France, for only the second time, enters a song employing Corsican, a language closer to Italian than French.  France is entering the Contest as the favorite among bookies and fans, not a heavy favorite, as Estonia, the UK, and Sweden are expected to battle it out for the vicotry.  I just don’t quite see it.  He’s not the first opera singer to take on Eurovision and he won’t be the last.  One thing every opera-inspired entry seems to shar in common: overratedness.  Remember SWE2009 – Malena Ernman was supposed to be an easy pick for the top ten; she finished in the bottom five.  And what about SLO and LAT2007?  They were both heralded as the first to bring opera to the Contest, both received a lot of fan love and support and neither one made it to the Top Ten.  I’m not saying that France can’t win, I just wouldn’t put money on it.

My predicitions for the Top Ten come the Grand Final on Saturday:

France, UK, Italy, Sweden, Greece, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Turkey, Estonia, Bosnia & Herzegovina.

In terms of a winner, I just can’t say.  The fans are all over the place, and I just can’t see any of the current top three (France, UK, Estonia) winning right now.  I also doubt Sweden will be able to give a winning performance given the rigor of the stage show they plan to put on.  So we will see.

I now bid you adieu.  My next posts will be my Notes from the Contest – live commentary I write as I am watching the Contest for the first time.  Until then, happy readings!  Only 14 days left until the Grand Final!