RtD14: Looking Back at Armenia

Hello Dear Readers!

We continue on in our Road to Denmark 2014 series with a look back at Armenia 2007-2013.  As a reminder, this retrospective is looking back all the entries that have competed since I first started following the Contest in 2007 in tribute to my return to Denmark for the 2014 edition of ESC.

Armenia

Armenian Flag MapClearly, I’m a fan of the Armenian entries (save for 2012).  As always, you can get a better view of the table by clicking on it.

2007 – Anytime You Need – A haunting ballad of desperate love.  It proved that Armenia’s success the previous year was not a fluke as the country landed in the Top Ten with their sophomore effort as well.

2008 – Qele, Qele – Armenia’s most successful entry to date.  Personally, I find it rather repetitive and simplistic, but it’s fun to dance to.

2009 – Jan Jan – One of the best examples of ethnopop at the Contest.  The sisters seamlessly blended traditional folk music with a dance beat, but still landed Armenia’s lowest finish at the time (10th place).

2010 – Apricot Stone – A fun song about the seed of Armenia’s national fruit, it calls us to return to our homeland.  A heavy favorite to win, the sixth place finish was considered a disappointment by many.

2011 – Boom, Boom – Proof that Armenia is not bulletproof.  Not only did Emmy become the first Armenian entry to fall outside of the Top Ten, she failed to even get out of the semi-final.  The song is fun…and that’s about it.

2013 – Lonely Planet – Armenia returned to the Contest with the country’s leading rock band and a song written by a rock legend.  Unfortunately, it was an average song with an average performance that resulted in a mid-table finish.

Let’s Take a Closer Look At: ArmeniaArmenia 2011.  This entry is remarkable for more than just the fact that it was an epic fail that dropped Armenia from the 100% Qualification Club; it’s remarkable as it is an example of something that happens to several countries each year – the weakest song in the national final comes out the winner.  Boom Boom beat out three songs that were miles better.  Goodbye is a heartbreaking ballad that, in the hands of a stronger singer, could have been a contender for victory; in the hands of Emmy, it would have at least continued the qualification streak.  Hi had as much energy as Boom Boom but had stronger lyrics and was generally more mature – it too would have gotten Armenia to the Final and threatened for the Top Ten.  Ayo, in my opinion, was not only high energy, but also utilized Emmy’s voice the best between the four options.  This song would have been a serious contender for the win!  Way to miss the boat Armenia.

What is your favorite Armenian entry and why?  Do you think if Emmy presented Ayo, she would have been more successful?

See previous entries here.  The next country we’ll reflect on is Austria.

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3 responses

  1. Davve

    Ayo was the best song! And everytime is armenias best entry.

    Like

    August 26, 2013 at 10:12 AM

  2. Pingback: RtD14: Looking Back at Andorra | Eurovision Obsession

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