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Howdy All!

I was hoping to publish this last week, but decided to wait to see if the EBU would release the split jury/televoting results.  They have yet to do so and I have grown tired of waiting.  If there’s anything significant, you can expect another post!

 

Best Dressed

Winner: France

A beautiful dress that I thought was used brilliantly throughout the performance, particularly when the wind machine was used.

Second Place: Serbia

Not just Joksimović, but the whole ensemble was dressed splendidly.

Third Place: Portugal

I like her dress; I don’t care what others think.

Honorable Mention: Bosnia & Herzgovina, Azerbaijan, Romania

 

Most In Need of Costume Change

Winner: Ireland

Really, really, do I need to explain this decision?

Second Place: Switzerland

There clothes were not too bad, but their hair was horrendous.

Third Place: Italy

I didn’t much care for her dress or her shoes, or the combination of the two items.

Honorable Mention: Belarus, Denmark, San Marino

 

Best Lyrics:

Winner: Bosnia & Herzegovina

“Nemoj mi kvariti dan, nikad mi nije bilo teže/Ti nisi živio sam u zlatu paukove mreže/Kao ja…Korake ti znam”

The lyrics tell a story of woman trying to salvage a relationship.  The tale that unfolds in the lyrics really draws you in.  Bravo!

Second Place: Spain

“Perdóname si no supe amarte, amor/No era mío el corazón/Quédate conmigo, quédate conmigo/Si no estás, no sale el sol”

Talk about trying to salvage a relationship, Quédate Conmigo poignantly captures the desperation one feels as you try to keep your love from walking away.

Third Place: Azerbaijan

“But I still wanna keep us alive/But it’s cold, cold, cold, cold when the music dies /t’s all black and white and there’s no sunrise/When the music dies”

Completing the pattern is a third song about a woman trying to save a relationship.  I love this song because of how final the lyrics are, the singer knows she’s at the end of line this is her final effort.  Also, the use of repetition is highly effective, as each time “cold” is sung it becomes more emphatic, more desperate.

Honorable Mention: Iceland, Macedonia, Finland

 

“Huh?” Award: given to the country the most questionable, lazy, or just plain nonsensical lyrics.

Winner: Russia

“Kırdžjalom žon-žon-žon, ektom mi kuaž-kuaž alji/Kırdžjalom žon-žon-žon, ektom mi kuaž-kuaž alji/Party for Everybody – Dance!”

The lyrics are rather repetitive, both the refrain and the actual stanzas.

Second Place: Ukraine

“You can be my guest!/People, be my/Guest!/Welcome People!/Na na, na na…”

Gaitana stated that she likes to write simple lyrics so that everyone can understand them.  Mission Accomplished.

Third Place: San Marino

“Oh oh, ooh oh oh…/Everybody loves you so/Ooh ooh, ooh oh oh…/Everybody lets you know/Do you wanna be more than just a friend?”

Arguably, it can be said that this was a satirical song.  However, I’m surprised that it was allowed to be performed given how many sexual references were littered throughout it.

Honorable Mention: Montenegro, Georgia, Switzerland

 

“Spirit of ABBA” Award: Give to the stereotypical ESC entry

Winner: Latvia

Mindless pop music – check.  Simple lyrics – check.  Unbelievably catchy tune – check.  Yep, this passes all the tests of standard schlager.  Congratulation Anmary of Latvia!

Second Place: Serbia

Returning Serbia to its roots, Joksimović crafted a beautiful ballad of heartbreak that the region has become known for.

Third Place: United Kingdom

Eurovision, past, present, and future, has truly always been about the ballads.  And the UK brought a strong one this year, definitely in line with a lot of what has been successful on the ESC stage through history.

Honorable Mention: Romania, Malta, Russia

 

“This is DC calling” Award: Given to the most American sounding entry

Winner: Slovakia

Normally, upon playing entries for friends, one is bound to hear comparisons between it and the American music market.  This year, only one elicited an immediate response in this vein – Slovakia.

Second Place: Norway

From the presentation to the costuming to the composition itself, this sounds like something that could easily have been produced in New York or LA.

Third Place: Cyprus

The first time I heard this song, I couldn’t help but think of Rihanna.  I think that fact that Cypriots went completely with dance music and forewent any ethno-undertones also contributed to this award.

Honorable Mention: Romania, Germany, Denmark

 

“Pond Leaper” Award: While I think each song would find a niche here in the USA, I think these songs would be the most popular

Winner: Cyprus

Because Americans love dance tracks, particularly ones that are still pop-y enough to receive a lot of radio airplay.

Second Place: Austria

Because Americans love anything imploring them to shake their booty.

Third Place: Germany

Because it’s an unexpected, anti-love ballad, Loeb looks and sounds like your standard indie-pop artist, and the song is catchy enough to have wide-appeal.

Honorable Mention: Italy, France, Hungary, United Kingdom

 

The “Shiri Maimon Travesty of the Year” Award: In 2005, a true work of art was entered into the ESC; Israel was being represented by Shiri Maimon with the song Hasheket Shinish’Ar.  Not only did this song not win, but the winning song that year was not even worthy to be performed on the same stage as the Israeli entry.  For me, that was the biggest travesty in Eurovision history.  Each year, I hand out this award to the biggest disappointment of the Contest.

 

Winning Moment: Iceland finishing 20th

This, in my opinion, should have been vying for victory.  It was an amazing performance of an amazing composition with amazing lyrics.  Of all the entries this year, this one, I think, had the best combination of parts.

 

Second Place: United Kingdom getting second to last place

This was an amazing ballad, well-deserving of a spot in the Top Ten.  It’s a downright shame that this entry faired so poorly.

 

Now, the big award…My Top Ten Award: Given to my ten favorite songs from the Contest.  Like last year, I liked every song enough to put it on my iPod (with one exception), but only ten of them can make this list.  The winners are ranked from tenth to first (most favorite).  These songs were the ones good enough to grab my attention and affection from the first moment I heard it at the Contest and have gotten the most plays on my iPod.

 

10. United Kingdom – A wonderful ballad performed by a legend

9. Iceland – A powerful song of lost love

8. Israel – Fun, catchy, and quirky

7. Norway – Great to sing along to!

6. Belarus – This song really grew on me once I looked up the lyrics

5. Italy – The song is dynamic and exciting; not to mention it keeps jazz relevant at the Contest

4. Sweden – An emotional and haunting song, truly beautiful

3. Spain – An impassioned ballad that truly connects the listener to the singer’s pain

2. Cyprus – Fun, catchy, and easy to sing along – and dance – to

1. France – My favorite entry despite the performance on Saturday night because of the lyrics, the music, the originality of the composition; I love Anggun’s voice on this track and love how all the various elements of the song come together as one.

 

Final Thoughts

First and foremost, kudos to Azerbaijan for a job well done!  I was pleasantly surprised by how well the event went.  Even though they did run over on the Final, I thought the pacing of the performances was great.  I enjoyed the postcards (even if they were a bit repetitive) and the interval acts.

Unlike the last couple of years, I do not have any major complaints or qualms about how things ultimately went down and have not seen too much backlash.  Should Norway have been last, probably not, but hey – they’ve done it more than anyone else, so it’s not very surprising.  Did a few songs outperform where they should have ended up, yes.  Did a few songs score lower than they deserved, yes.  Was there any outrageous placements, not really.  2012 was a year with minimal controversy.  I think it’s also worth noting that the Greeks have finally fallen from grace; for the first time since 2003, the Hellenic Republic has fallen outside the Top Ten.  I wonder if this is a reflection of Europe growing tired of them sending the same song every year (I doubt that) or more a reflection of the strength of competition this time around (much more likely).

Overall, a good (but not great) year for the ESC.  There were strong entries that were beautiful examples of artistry and there were entries meant more for entertainment purposes.  The entirety of the Big Five seem to be taking the Contest very seriously and are seeing the fruits of their labor.  In fact, just about every country seems to be taking it seriously, and those that don’t seem to be competing with gag entries that actually stand a chance of doing well.  Overall, I’m pleased with the outcome as well as the trend that Sweden’s victory sets.  Serious entries with heartfelt performances are still winning and the results are diverse enough that no one can complain of bloc voting.  Of the Top Ten, three were from the former USSR, one was Nordic, and one was Yugoslavian (the three blocs considered to be the most powerful).  Of the remaining five, three hailed from Western Europe, one was Turkey, and one was a country with one of the most unremarkable ESC records out there (Albania).  While I don’t think this Contest was particularly historic, I do think it will be remembered as one of the smoothest and least controversial ones to date.

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